Fighting for Healthy Food in New York – English Short

Fighting for Healthy Food in New York – English Short


(slow piano music) – I was diagnosed in 2002 with diabetes. It was on the onset, so at the time, the doctor informed me that, well, a lot of people get diagnosed, but they don’t all
follow the dietary rules. It’s hard to find healthy
food options in the bodegas. Sandwiches, that’s the main focus. There’s also canned goods, but they’re not necessarily low in sodium or for a healthy, vegetarian aspect to it. And then they’re not placed in
prominent parts of the store. So essentially, by the time
you get past the first steps, you’ve selected a bag of chips, a soda or a beer, and a
sandwich and you’re out. If the only thing that’s
around you is unhealthy food, and you can’t afford to go
outside of your neighborhood or you don’t have transportation, you eat what’s there. And that’s why people
have become unhealthy in certain areas. If you walk into a store and you see that the tomatoes are moldy, or the
lettuce is soggy and wilted, you’re just not going to
buy your produce there. So our work starts with
our produce manager, who goes to the grocery
stores or the bodegas and get them to agree to let him come in and transform their produce department. We chose Bedford-Stuyvesant as our healthy neighborhood from Brooklyn because there are still
large pockets of poverty. More than a quarter of
the people in Bed-Stuy have a prevalence for diabetes, one third of the people
there are still obese, and then 90 percent of the
people in Bedford-Stuyvesant reported not eating enough
fruits and vegetables during their day. – We have to look at our landscape, our environmental landscape, and see what is available to us. What is saturating our community? We’re saturated with junk food, we’re saturated with fried food. And getting locally sourced, or at least really good quality produce everywhere, like if we can just make
a comparison, right, it’s not a comparison. It’s a grave injustice. We do have a lot of
really great initiatives that are really working on changing that. We have a long history
of people who grow food, who know what agriculture is,
who know what good food is. Healthy food access, to me, means the reclaiming of
power in communities. And that’s what food security,
that’s what food justice, that’s what food sovereignty is about. It’s the reclaiming of
power in communities who need and deserve it most.


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